* This post may have affiliate links. Please see my Disclosure.*

Combining Two HD Antennas for Better Reception

Have you been frustrated at times with your HD antenna reception? Do some channels come and go and are not as strong as they should be? There also might be a few channels that are out of reach by your current antenna setup. By combining two HD antennas together you can increase your current signal strength and channel coverage. In this article, I will explain how to set this up and what are the benefits of a two over the air antenna system.

Combining Two HD Antennas Methods

Like I stated earlier, combining two HD antennas can have a positive impact on your signal coverage. In many cases, it can improve weak signal strength. Let’s look at three methods to combine your HD antennas. One method will be used to increase your current signal strength. The other method is used to gain channels from towers located in different directions and the last method called antenna stacking can help with those hard to get stations. In all cases, your location to the broadcast towers will be a factor. In some cases, the towers may be too far away to obtain any channels. You can use our Station Locator Tool by clicking on the icon below to determine how far away the broadcast towers are from your location.

TV Station Locator Tool

Cabling, Cable Lenght and Rescanning

With all of these setups, cable length and the style of cabling is very important. Make sure the cables coming from the antennas that are going into the combiner or joiner are the same length and are identical. If not, it could cause phasing issues because the signal from the antenna will not reach the combiner at the same time. This can cause the tuner to not properly lock on to a channel. Make sure that you rescan the tuner each time you make a change to the antenna setup. This will ensure that you are receiving the proper channels. It can also help to use the signal strength tool that most TVs and tuners have in the menu option. This is useful to see what type of signal strength you have for each channel.

Two HD Antennas Pointing in The Same Direction

This method can be used to increase the current signal strength to existing channels coming from broadcast towers in the same direction. By adding a second OTA antenna you can increase your signal strength. If you already have an amplifier to boost your signal a second antenna can help to increase the consistency of your coverage. Depending on how the signal is being sent, obstructions can interfere with the delivery of the signal path. Adding a second antenna can increase the signal path coverage and give you a more consistent signal. To accomplish this you will need a combiner or coupler that can combine the two antennas together. I would recommend that you use two identical antennas. This will ensure a balanced signal path and coverage. Try experimenting with placement and proper directional pointing.

Winegard CC-7870 Antenna Coupler

The Winegard CC-7870 Antenna Coupler combines any two 75 Ohm HDTV antennas into one. Features low -3.5 insertion loss.

eBay:

Winegard CC-7870 Antenna Coupler

Amazon:

Winegard CC-7870 Antenna Coupler


Pre-made Dual Antennas

If you don’t feel up to making your own dual antenna setup, many companies sell pre-made setups. Here are a few options to consider.

Antennas Direct 8 Element Bowtie Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna

Antennas Direct 8 Element bowtie indoor/outdoor HDTV antenna features patented elements and specially designed brackets that allow the two panels to turn in different directions to target widely-spaced broadcast towers. The reflector focuses the antenna’s power for added range and also provides protection against multi-path interference.

Antennas Direct:

Antennas Direct 8 Element Bowtie Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna

Amazon:

Antennas Direct 8 Element Bowtie Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna


Xtreme Signal HDB8X 8-Bay VHF/UHF HDTV Bowtie Antenna

The Xtreme Signal HDB8X VHF/UHF HDTV bowtie antenna is an 8-bay bowtie outdoor TV antenna. It receives signals from stations up to 65 miles away in a single direction. This antenna allows for you to point each side in a different direction

eBay:

Xtreme Signal HDB8X 8-Bay VHF/UHF HDTV Bowtie Antenna

Amazon:

Xtreme Signal HDB8X 8-Bay VHF/UHF HDTV Bowtie Antenna


Two HD Antennas Pointing in Opposite Directions

This method will help if the broadcast towers are in different directions. If you are not sure where your broadcast towers are you can use our Station Locator Tool to locate broadcast towers in your area. The basic idea is to have each antenna pointing at different broadcast towers. This can help you obtain those channels that a single antenna could not reach. You could use a rotary antenna to solve this problem, but if you are splitting the signal to multiple TV’s this could be an issue. This would not allow others to watch different stations at the same time. With the two-antenna setup, this can resolve that problem. Again the same rules apply. An antenna coupler or joiner will be needed. Below is a diagram by Channel Master explaining the setup using their joiner. It may take some tweaking to get the antennas pointed in the proper directions. Just be patient and rescan your tuner to see what channels you gained.

Images credit: Channel Master

Build your own using these components.

You can build your own setup using these components. Pole mount two 1byone outdoor antenna’s pointing in opposite directions. Then use the Channel Master JOINtenna to combine them.

1byone Amplified Outdoor Digital HDTV Antenna

The 1byone amplified outdoor HDTV antenna is ready to mount. It comes with a mounting pole and power amp. It has a range of 85 miles.

eBay:

1byone Amplified Outdoor Digital HDTV Antenna

Amazon:

1byone Amplified Outdoor Digital HDTV Antenna

Channel Master CM-0500 JOINtenna TV Antenna Combiner

The Channel Master JOINtenna allows you to combine two OTA antennas into one. This is ideal for two antennas pointing at broadcast towers in different directions.

Channel Master:

Channel Master CM-0500 JOINtenna TV Antenna Combiner

Amazon:

Channel Master CM-0500 JOINtenna TV Antenna Combiner

Doug Hall has a great video below explaining his setup for towers in different locations.

HD Antenna Stacking

Antenna stacking is the process of taking two HD antennas and placing one on top or near each other. This can improve your antenna reception for long-distance towers. It is important to get the spacing and phasing correct for both antennas. It is best to use two different styles of antennas that will complement each other. You can try experimenting and built one on your own. The example below shows a rabbit ear style combined with a bow-tie antenna to better capture the UHF and VHF bands. By combining these two styles of OTA antennas you can increase your overall coverage. This setup works quite well and effectively pulls in many channels.

 

Fairpoint Farms shows his HD stacked antennas in the video below. It allowed him to gain many stations from a long way out.

Pre-Built Stacked Antennas

The ClearStream 4V Antenna is essentially two antennas stacked. Each antenna is dedicated to UHF and VHF frequencies. This allows for greater coverage in less than ideal locations. It can be mounted in the attic or on the roof.

ClearStream 4V Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna

The ClearStream 4V indoor/outdoor HDTV antenna offers crystal-clear, high-definition signals. Thanks to its quick-connect assembly, this antenna has a unique, integrated diplexer for reliable, multi-directional UHF and VHF reception. Ideal for rural areas. Includes 20″ mast, mounting hardware, and adjustable mast clamp.

Antennas Direct:

ClearStream 4V Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna

Amazon:

ClearStream 4V Indoor/Outdoor HDTV Antenna

You can also buy one from Denny’s TV Antenna Service. They build custom stackers and have been producing them for many years with good success. Here are several examples of custom antenna stackers they have built (shown below). Again each antenna complements each other giving you good overall coverage of the UHF and VHF bands.

Images credit: Denny’s TV Antenna Service

Conclusion

Combining two HD antennas can have a positive impact on your overall channel coverage and reception. If you are looking to increase your signal coverage it may be worth experimenting. Please feel free to comment below for questions or if you have experimented with any of these types of setups. What were your results? You can also submit questions to our forums page.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,948 other subscribers

September 3, 2020 0

Get More OTA Channels With a Better Tuner

Last updated: Thursday, September 3, 2020I have received many comments about people having issues with tuner reception. Several readers are frustrated that one TV gets more channels than the other one. I am experiencing the same problem. I have two TV’s connected to one OTA antenna in my attic. My Samsung TV has better reception than my RCA television. Both televisions have different tuners. Samsung televisions generally have better tuners. If you are having the same issues, there are several ways to receive more OTA channels with a better tuner. Check The Tuner The first step to troubleshoot this problem is to check the tuner’s functionality on the television that is having issues obtaining channels. Unplug [...]
Ad
About Johan
I started this site to educate the public on alternative ways you can watch television besides subscribing to cable. I have been in the audio-visual business for over 20 years. I also have an extensive computer networking background. I am a Microsoft Certified Professional and CompTIA Network+ Certified Technician. I hope you will find my articles and reviews helpful in conscious uncabling.

8 Comments

  1. can the signal from two antennas be combined just before my Tivo antenna connection?

  2. Gregory W. Greig March 21, 2020 at 9:40 am

    Can I just splice the wires the same length in series or parallel, will this work?

  3. I currently have the Clearstream 2V and it gets all of my local channels except for there’s one that has a good bit of pixelation on it. Would combining the 2V with a directional antenna to get the channel I want be ideal? Already have one of the recommended combiners and would use the same cables and lengths. Also, do I introduce the preamp after I combined the signals? The antennas will be mounted in my attic and I’m in a rural area about 30 miles from the stations.

    • Adding a second directional antenna could help. The general rule of thumb is to install the antenna preamp before the combiner. You can try experimenting using both preamps on or just one on and the other off. One scenario might work better than the other. It might take a few adjustments to get it working. Good luck and let us know how it all worked out.

      • Thank you. Adding second antenna didn’t help. In fact, it made matters worse. I tried adding before the preamp and after and I even have a combiner that allows for electrical pass through. I think the problem is it could be I used a cheap mono price antenna as my second one. My Clearstream 2V was working perfectly. Now, when I try to put everything back to normal I don’t get the same signal strength as I was before on the clearstream. I think I may have loosened one of the connectors on the RG6 cable. I’m gonna put a brand new cable in this weekend and see if I can get back to where I was or even better.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*